Some clients are thankless jerks...

Aug 19, 2020 2:16 pm

Let's be honest with ourselves.


Some of your past clients were thankless jerks who didn't deserve your time.


But how do you stop that from happening again?


If you run a restaurant or a tap house, or a retail store, you can't stop them from coming in to your business.


Though you could have one of those signs that say "We reserve the right to refuse service to anyone." But you have to find out they are jerks first before you can kick them out.


The public is the public and you don't have any way to put a filter on your front door. 


Or do you? 


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Have You Heard of Godwin's Law?

Godwin's Law states the following: 


"As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Hitler approaches 1"


Approaches 1 means that it becomes almost a certainty.


This was coined by Attorney Mike Godwin way back on Usenet in 1990. Usenet was the text-discussion predecessor to the modern Internet.


It's obvious in modern discussions, it only takes about 5 comments on any "news" or political post for someone to get called a Nazi these days. 


The fact is when people are relatively anonymous or have no real consequences, they will act in a way that's different than they would if there were real repercussions to their actions. Or as Iron Mike Tyson would say...


“Social media made you all way too comfortable with disrespecting people and not getting punched in the face for it.” (source: WBN)


A person going to a Pub and using racial slurs, insulting staff, offending another patron has very little repercussions in most cases besides getting kicked out. But they can always go to another bar down the street. Thing is though, once in while, someone is going to punch them in their pie-hole.


Online, people talk sh-t all day long... had a bad day? Go on the Facebooks and call Sarah a Nazi because she said she doesn't think we should have one-way streets downtown. 


The point is, the only way to win the game is not to play. 


Block the trolls, kick out the bad customers, don't engage the anonymous ass-hats on social media. 


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What Does This Have to do With My Customers?

You need a filter to prevent bad customers from coming in the door and wasting your time.


Doesn't matter if you are an online business, a coach, a writer, a realtor, a tap house owner, or an insurance agent.


Take the time to chat with your prospects before they become customers. Get to know them a little, and set proper expectations up front.


What does your business do, and better still, what do you NOT do?


What is included with what your customer is paying for?


If you're a business where just anyone can walk in off the street, you can "dress" your business to match your clientele.


People don't want to patronize places where they feel they don't fit in.


Raising your prices can help weed-out some of the people who may not be a fit for your business. This works for any business from a tavern to a plumber.


Look for warning signs, such as clients who don't pay in a timely manner, or refuse to communicate, or ask the same questions you've already answered repeatedly.


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If a relationship is not working out for whatever reason, cut your losses and drop them.


I don't care if it's a staff member, a vendor or a client.


If it's not working out, just cut your losses and move on.


There are other great clients out there just waiting for someone awesome like you to work with. Someone who will appreciate you!


Spend your time finding people who "get it" and are glad to be a part of what you are doing. 


As my hypnotherapist friend, Michelle De Lude says, "drop the baggage and enjoy the journey."


The time and aggravation you spend on clients who are thankless and disrespectful will cause you nothing but pain in the long run. They are time-vampires stealing time away from your good, profitable clients.


Don't let them suck you dry.


Drop them like it's hot.


Now go forth and be profitable.


~Matt


P.S. Start making your future paycheck now with the Outreach Challenge.

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